Tag Archives: Shiplap Timber Cladding

How to Prepare Your Timber Cladding

How to Prepare Your Timber Cladding

Over the years, there seems to be one frequent question that always pops up – “how is timber cladding installed?” So we thought we would answer that in two parts, with the first being about how to prepare your timber cladding.

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Cladding

What do those Cladding terms mean?

There are many different types of home and shed cladding, which means that there will be numerous amount of terms that you will have to know. Thus allowing you to know what you are getting for your money. Below we have listed some of the terms, with brief descriptions, that you should know. Continue reading

Long-lasting

How do you make your timber cladding long-lasting?

You’ve decided to go for exterior timber home or shed cladding and you have had it installed. How do you now make sure it is long-lasting? Well, a number of factors should be taken into account, read on to find out what they are.

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How to repair shiplap siding

Shiplap siding is a building material that protects the underlying structure of your house from water and damage from the sunlight.

The separate boards which are used to make up the siding are designed to lock together tightly with one another to create a shell around the house.

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Why You Should Have Exterior Cladding

Using exterior timber cladding is essentially providing a protective layer of material that separates a building’s structure and interior from the outside elements, including sound and weather.

Exterior cladding is effective at protecting against solar damage, temperature, water and wind.

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Hardwood and softwood timber

There are two different types of wood that people refer to when talking about timber: softwood and hardwood.

Although the names may suggest, this has nothing to do with the density of the wood. Some softwoods can be harder than some hardwood. The name solely comes from the tree the wood comes from.

Softwood

Softwood is the wood that is extracted from coniferous trees that keep their foliage all year round. Common softwood trees are pine and fir which can be found in cooler areas of the globe.

The advantages of softwood is generally easier manipulate and has a variety of uses. Softwood is the prime wood for a lot of structural work and can be found in furniture as well as window and door frames.

Hardwood

Hardwood will generally come from broadleaved trees. Typically, these are native British trees such as ash, beech and oak. There are significantly more hardwood species compared to softwood.

Hardwood trees are deciduous, meaning they lose their leaves in the winter months. The wood, however, is incredibly resistant to decay when it is used for any exterior work. Previous hardwoods, especially tropical hardwoods, had been widely available, unfortunately, the supply has been restricted as a result of the concern for conserving tropical forests.

Did you know?: 80% of all timber comes from softwood.

Find out more about timber cladding properties here! Please visit our website to view our range of timber cladding.

Types of Timber Cladding

A timber cladding exterior of a home acts as a form of protection from moisture and air penetration.

Builders have been utilising wood cladding since the late eighteenth-century until they began implementing modern construction techniques.

There are few styles of timber claddings, but those that are offer unique character:

Tapered Lap Timber Cladding

Tapered Lap Timber Cladding has a certain tapered thickness at the very top of the cladding with a widened bottom.
Cladding is installed horizontally with a 30mm overlap on each of the pieces.
It is then nailed to the walls just above the overlap.

Notched Lap

This particular cladding has the same taper to it as lap cladding, however the top and bottom are notched, thus allowing the pieces to fit together when they are installed.
The overlap will be approximately 15mm and again, the cladding will be nailed to the wall just above the cladding overlap.

Shiplap Timber Cladding

Shiplap Timber Cladding has a notched overlap and a slight angle after the notch for that extra touch of character.
This siding would be nailed directly through the face of the siding with two nails with a 25mm overlap.

Chamferbaord Timber Cladding

Also known as Dutchlap, the installation design is notched with the top shaped at a long angle of about 10 degrees.
An overlap of approximately 12mm will be integrated into the design and will be nailed through the face of the of the siding ensuring it’s secured into the walls.

For more information about Shiplap Timber Cladding, please visit our website!